• Talent: The Currency of Competitive Advantage

    May 25, 2016

    Perry Puccetti

    criticaltalent

    As described in Don’t Crack Under Pressure Part I: A Business Diagnostic, and Part II: Managing Tension, a business’ ability to make money is directly influenced by how well it understands the cause and effect relationships between the various pressures that businesses face, how effectively it manages tension, and addresses the symptoms that serve as leading indicators requiring action to be taken.

    This blog describes how the Business Diagnostic can be applied to Talent as a Service (TaaS).

    Applying the Business Diagnostic.

    Ecosystem level forces are the underlying macro events or trends that serve as a “catalyst” requiring businesses to make decisions or take actions that address the pressures created by these events or trends.

    Globalization and the increasing demand for a technologically skilled workforce has created a shortage of skilled talent. A Bloomberg BusinessWeek survey on Global Economics showed that over one-third of the 38,000 companies surveyed in 41 countries and territories reported that they were unable to find the talent they needed. In Asia, 45% of employers report difficulties in finding the right talent to hire. In the Americas, 41% faced similar challenges – and the trend continues to increase.  In addition, the fundamental dynamic between companies and their employees has changed. Today, employees find job security not in the company itself, but in their individual knowledge and their application of that knowledge to create value – in other words, job “security” is found with the employee and not necessarily with the company. 

    Job “security” is found with the individual, not necessarily with a company

    Enterprise level forces are the direct effect caused by the Ecosystem level macro events/trends and the resultant decisions and actions that must be taken by business leaders at the enterprise level that are a direct response to these pressures.

    As a result, more than 33% of businesses are unable to find the talent they need. Key issues are lack of hard skills (e.g., IT knowledge and technology skills), insufficient work experience, lack of soft skills, lack of “employability”, (e.g., characteristics such as motivation and interpersonal skills), unrealistic salary expectations, and unwillingness to work part time. In addition, many companies, instead of hiring full-time employees to tackle short-term technology projects are hiring contingent workers who are highly skilled in those areas – this trend places additional demand on a limited pool of talent. Additionally, regional factors may come into play in finding qualified talent.  

    Any talent you don’t have is a critical one

    Business unit level pressures are the direct effect caused by the Enterprise level pressures. The resultant decisions and actions that must be taken by business units as a result of the decisions and actions made at the Enterprise level – these are the day-to-day business challenges that are solved on a day-to-day basis.

    Many organizations continue to try and acquire critical talent under this old paradigm; failing to understand that this shift in value creation/job security and the talent acquisition methods required to obtain the best talent is a fundamental shift, not a temporary one. 

    In order to compete and win in the race for talent, where time is nobody’s friend, you must know what your critical talent needs are: do you require FTEs or consultants; can you use CAPEX versus OPEX; are they long-term needs/part of your core business; or, short-term project-based needs such as an ERP implementation; and perhaps a very basic question – where do you find top talent?

    At the end of the day, technologies and processes can be copied, quickly negating any competitive advantage they may have provided. What cannot be copied is what is in the heart and minds of your employees; this is your true competitive advantage.

    The team with the best talent wins

  • User Experience: Where Great Design Meets Great Business

    May 23, 2016

    Perry Puccetti

    uxfirstimpressionsdomatter

     User-driven design isn’t just about creating a great experience for your customers, it’s also a smart business move – Spencer Lanoue

    As described in Don’t Crack Under Pressure Part I: A Business Diagnostic, and Part II: Managing Tension, a business’ ability to make money is directly influenced by how well it understands the cause and effect relationships between the various pressures that businesses face, how effectively it manages tension, and addresses the symptoms that serve as leading indicators requiring action to be taken.

    This blog describes how the Business Diagnostic can be applied to User Experience.

    Applying the Business Diagnostic.

    Ecosystem level forces are the underlying macro events or trends that serve as a “catalyst” requiring businesses to make decisions or take actions that address the pressures created by these events or trends.

    With the explosion of social media and the proliferation of affordable, highly featured smartphones and tablets, customers are becoming incredibly sophisticated, elusive, and empowered. As a result, the dynamics that govern the relationship between brands and customers is also evolving. In this hyper-connected, interactive, and increasingly mobile world, every aspect of a user’s interaction with a product, service, or company matters as it forms the basis for the user’s perceptions of that product, service, or company. With the world rapidly approaching billions of “connected” users, User Experience matters. 

    88% of online consumers are less likely to return to a site after a bad experience – Econsultancy

    Enterprise level forces are the direct effect caused by the Ecosystem level macro events/trends and the resultant decisions and actions that must be taken by business leaders at the enterprise level that are a direct response to these pressures.

    User Experience encompasses all aspects of the end-user's interaction with a company, its services, and its products. The first requirement for an exemplary User Experience is to meet the exact needs of the customer, without fuss or bother. Next comes simplicity and elegance that produce products that are a joy to own, a joy to use. True User Experience goes far beyond giving customers what they say they want, or providing checklist features. In order to achieve high-quality User Experience in a company's offerings there must be a seamless intersection between technology and creativity. For many employees today, collaborative, complex problem solving is the essence of their work. 

    94% of first impressions are design related – Kinesis

    Business unit level pressures are the direct effect caused by the Enterprise level pressures. The resultant decisions and actions that must be taken by business units as a result of the decisions and actions made at the Enterprise level – these are the day-to-day business challenges that are solved on a day-to-day basis.

    Even the best content and most sophisticated technology will not help you achieve your business goals without a cohesive, consistent User Experience to support it. Creating the User Experience can seem overwhelmingly complex. While it may seem that with so many issues involved such as usability, brand identity, information architecture, and interaction design to name a few, the only way to succeed is to spend a fortune on specialists. The reality is that the best User Experiences are the most intuitive, and empathize with the user.

    The following infographic provides a number of key insights.

    userexperiencestats

    For most customers, your website will be their first point of contact with your brand.

    Within .05 seconds of your page loading, a customer has already formed an opinion – Kinesis

    Forward thinking business leaders are taking steps to position their companies for success in the “digital economy” by ensuring that however a customer interacts with their company – the experience is an enjoyable one.

    While it is a given that your website or mobile application must do all of the things it is supposed to do from a technology aspect, User Experience focuses on the human aspect… how do your customers feel about your brand… how are you making their lives that little bit easier.

    How?

    Ensure your customer/employee facing applications, websites, and mobile applications:

    • Add value to users by helping them do what they need to do
    • Are easy to use/intuitive from the user’s point of view
    • Have short learning curves and are easy to start using right away
    • Elicit an emotional response/are visually appealing… based upon the application’s purpose

    Happy customers are loyal customers and will refer your brand to others, and, for customers you made feel special, or made their lives a little easier, they have the potential to become customers for life (think Apple).

    Great design and great business go hand-in-hand – how you choose to invest in User Experience will affect your bottom line.

    See the video

  • It's A Mobile First World - Are You Ready?

    May 16, 2016
    Perry Puccetti

    mobilefirstworld

    As described in Don’t Crack Under Pressure Part I: A Business Diagnostic, and Part II: Managing Tension, a business’ ability to make money is directly influenced by how well it understands the cause and effect relationships between the various pressures that businesses face, how effectively it manages tension, and addresses the symptoms that serve as leading indicators requiring action to be taken.

    This blog describes how the Business Diagnostic can be applied to a specific example – Mobility.

    Applying the Business Diagnostic.

    Ecosystem level forces are the underlying macro events or trends that serve as a “catalyst” requiring businesses to make decisions or take actions that address the pressures created by these events or trends.

    Globalization and an increasingly mobile workforce, the continued blurring of work and personal time, and the proliferation of affordable, highly capable mobile devices are creating a landscape that is in many ways similar to that of the Internet which was driven by rapid customer adoption and constant innovation. For example, according to a recent Gartner report, there were over 5 billion smartphones in use with 6.7 billion being projected, and 90% of all mobile devices being outside of the United States. In addition, the world is approaching billions of Internet-connect users, tens of billions of connected consumer electronic devices and hundreds of billions of commercial or industrial connected devices. Mobility represents a fundamental and irreversible change with customers deciding how, when and where they connect with businesses and access information. In other words, businesses no longer decide when or how they connect with their customers (or employees) – customers and employees do.

    Enterprise level forces are the direct effect caused by the Ecosystem level macro events/trends and the resultant decisions and actions that must be taken by business leaders at the enterprise level that are a direct response to these pressures.

    Enterprise mobility continues to fundamentally change the business landscape as ever-higher-performing smartphones, tablets, and other devices enabled by 3G and 4G networks, as well as the explosion of innovative applications, creates an inevitable wave of change. The consumerization of IT is the most powerful driving force across the enterprise. Mobility is impacting organizations on the front-end and the back-end opening new opportunities for improved operations across many lines of business providing better customer-facing applications and increased ease of access to business-critical resources. As a result, and according to a recent McKinsey report, 56% of CIOs are reporting strong demand from employees to support a wide range of mobile devices (BYOD), 77% of CIOs are planning to allow staff to use personal mobile devices to access company data and applications, almost all of the CIOs surveyed said they expected to deploy more than 25 mobility applications in the next two years, and 30% of the CIOs said laptops could be replaced by tablets in coming years. In addition, the rapidly expanding set of cloud-based applications that enable mobile devices to overcome their inherent limitations and allow users to access their content, regardless of the storage capacity of their devices, will enable ubiquitous access to critical enterprise resources such as CRM.

    Business unit level pressures are the direct effect caused by the Enterprise level pressures. The resultant decisions and actions that must be taken by business units as a result of the decisions and actions made at the Enterprise level – these are the day-to-day business challenges that are solved on a day-to-day basis.

    Mobility is not a technology or an “IT issue”, it is a business one, and therefore driven by the CEO with focus being placed on the three primary areas of growing revenue, brand awareness, and productivity. Business units will need to ensure that their day-to-day activities enable those three areas. For example, have you taken a mobile first approach with your website? Do you need a mobile application? How do you plan on engaging your customers? And, who are your customers? These are examples of growing revenue. Do you have an established brand? What new customers will you be able to reach? What are your marketing goals? These are examples of brand awareness. Do your employees have remote access to content and applications anytime/anywhere? Do you support BYOD? And, can you access applications such as CRM and ERP? These are examples of productivity.

    The following infographic provides a number of key insights.

    mobility
    Source: Mobile World Conference 

    Some of the leading indicators of potential problems or symptoms for companies that have not addressed mobility are loss of revenue, brand erosion, employee churn, decreased productivity, increased costs, reduced market share, declining demand for products and services, and poor perception in the market by customers and employees alike – which only exacerbates the other symptoms.

    It is not a matter of if a business needs to address mobility, but when, with businesses that do not potentially becoming irrelevant in their respective market.

    By using the Business Diagnostic, businesses may not be able to control the pressures impacting them, but they can control how they respond to them.

    It’s a mobile first world…  Are you ready?

    See the video

More than one Google Analytics scripts are registered. Please verify your pages and templates.